Saskatoon Sinhala Language School Commences for the Academic Year 2012/2013

By Anusha Samaranayaka
Secretary, Saskatoon Sinhala Language School

This is a reminder that the Saskatoon Sinhala Language School Classes for the academic year 2012/2013 will begin next Sunday (September 9th, 2012) at the Aden Bowman Collegiate. Similar to other years, all classes will start at 10 a.m. in the class rooms 115, 119, and 121. We re-allocated all returning students to this year classes according to the progress they achieved in last year and revised the curriculum for all three levels according to our students’ needs.  Look forward meeting you all!

New Students Welcome!

We are happy to welcome new students at all levels (between 3 to 16 yrs of age) to the Sinhala Language School. The classes will be held on every Sunday from 10 a.m. to 12 p.m. (Term-1: Sept. 9th-Dec 16th, Term-2: Jan 6th– June 9th) at the Aden Bowman Collegiate (1904 Clarence Avenue South, Saskatoon), except on special holiday weekends. Classes are taught in three levels: elementary, intermediate, and advanced.

This is a great venue for your children to learn and maintain Sinhala language and to interact with other kids in the Saskatoon Sri Lankan community. Even if your child already has Sinhala language skills, this will be a perfect place to maintain that valuable asset while living in Canada. Not only that, students from this language school participate in Sri Lankan community events in Saskatoon through  our cultural dancing, singing and music performances in Sinhala. Our kids have performed short sinhala drams in the past. All these activities carried out through the language school help sharpening various skills. Sinhala Language School students also participate in the Multilingual Choral Festival held every year in celebration of the Mother Tongue Day in Saskatoon. There is no fee associated with the classes. Students are provided with stationary and resource materials required for the lessons. In the past few years we all enjoyed a year end picnic/educational trip involving all student families. Our teachers work with student’s individual language needs focusing on cultural and family values.

If you are interested in enrolling your child/children, please contact us by e-mailing to sasksls@gmail.com (our new e-mail address) or calling one of the office bearers elected for this academic year (mentioned at the end of this mail). Also, please let us know if you require transportation arrangements for your children to attend the school, we will try our best to help you with that.

About the Saskatoon Sinhala Language School

For those who are new to Saskatoon or do not know much about the Sinhala Language School started in 2005, this is part of the Heritage Language Schools conducted by the Saskatchewan Intercultural Association (SIA, http://saskintercultural.org/index.php?option=com_frontpage&Itemid=1).   The Saskatoon Public School Board provides space to conduct these classes and the SIA provides funding to buy necessary school supplies, to book class rooms, and to pay for the teachers. The uniqueness of our language school is all teachers are volunteers from the community. So the money allocated to teachers’ salaries is used to buy necessary school supplies and to organize events such as Sinhala and Tamil New Year celebration and year end trip. As mentioned before, we do not charge any fee from students for the classes. Our formal website will be created soon, and for now, you can get some information about our school through the SaskLanka community weblog (http://blogs.usask.ca/sinhalapanthiya/).

New office bearers of the Sinahla Language School for the 2012/2013 academic year are Ajith Kumara (President, Ph: 384-5118), Anusha Samaranayaka (Secretary, Ph: 979-1060), Kosala Rajapaksha (Treasurer), and Thushan Sanjeewa, Prabhath Lokuge, Nalinda Dissanayake, and Samantha Ekanayake (Committee members).

Together with many families and community volunteers, the Sinhala Language School helps our children to attain many skills to explore Sri Lankan heritage away from Sri Lanka. This really helps to develop personal identity and gain the means to bridge the language barriers which often isolate our children from their grandparents and relatives back home!

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s